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DECEMBER 2011 CURLING NEWS



The Rules of Curling

From Curling; Written by Steve Dowling on 2011-11-04
The Rules of Curling

Curling is a sport in which players slide stones across a sheet of ice towards a target area. Two teams, each of four players, take turns sliding heavy, polished granite stones, also called "rocks", across the ice curling sheet towards the house, a circular target marked on the ice. Each team has eight stones. The purpose is to accumulate the highest score for a game; points are scored for the stones resting closest to the center of the house at the conclusion of each end, which is completed when both teams have thrown all of their stones. A game may consist of ten or eight ends.

The curler can induce a curved path by causing the stone to slowly turn as it slides, and the path of the rock may be further influenced by two sweepers with brooms who accompany it as it slides down the sheet, using the brooms to alter the state of the ice in front of the stone. A great deal of strategy and...(Read More)


Curling Equipment - The Broom and Shoes

From Curling; Written by Steve Dowling on 2011-11-08

The curling broom, or brush, is used to sweep the ice surface in the path of the stone, and is also often used as a balancing aid during delivery of the stone.

In earlier days, brooms were made of corn strands and were similar to household brooms. Brushes were used primarily by elderly curlers as a substitute for corn brooms. Today, brushes have replaced traditional corn brooms at every level of curling, but are universally referred to as brooms. Curling brushes may have fabric, hog hair, or horsehair heads. Modern curling broomsticks are usually hollow tubes made of fiberglass or carbon fiber instead of a solid length of wooden dowel. These hollow tube handles are lighter and stronger than wooden handles, allowing faster sweeping and also enabling more downward force to be applied to the broom head with reduced shaft flex.

Curling shoes are similar to ordinary athletic shoes except...(Read More)


Curling Equipment - The Rock or Stone

From Curling; Written by Steve Dowling on 2011-11-08

The curling stone or rock, as defined by the World Curling Federation, is a thick stone disc weighing between 38 and 44 pounds with a handle attached to the top. The maximum allowable circumference is 36 inches. The minimum height is 4.5 inches. The handle is attached by a bolt running vertically through a hole in the center of the stone. The handle allows the stone to be gripped and rotated upon release; on properly prepared ice, the stone's path will curl in the direction the front edge of the stone is turning, especially as the stone slows. The handles are colored to identify the stones by team. Two popular colors in major tournaments are red and yellow. The only part of the stone in contact with the ice is the running surface, a narrow, flat annulus or ring, 0.25 to 0.50 inch wide and about 5 inches in diameter; the sides of the stone bulge convex down to the ring and the inside of the...(Read More)


Curling Equipment - The Playing Surface

From Curling; Written by Steve Dowling on 2011-11-08
Curling Equipment - The Playing Surface

The playing surface or curling sheet is defined by the World Curling Federation Rules of Curling. The sheet is an area of ice, carefully prepared to be as flat and level as possible, approximately 150 feet in length by 15 feet in width.

A target, known as the house, is marked at each end of the sheet. The house consists of three rings formed by painting or laying colored vinyl sheet under the ice and are usually distinguished by color. These rings are defined by their diameters as the four-foot, eight-foot and 12-foot rings. The rings are merely a visual aid for aiming and judging which stone is closer to the center; they do not affect scoring but a stone must at least touch the outer ring or it does not score.

Each house is centered on the intersection of the center line, drawn lengthwise down the center of the sheet and one of the tee lines, drawn 16 feet from, and parallel to, each...(Read More)


Origins and History of Curling

From Curling; Written by Steve Dowling on 2011-11-08

Curling is thought to have been invented in medieval Scotland, with the first written reference to a contest using stones on ice coming from the records of Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, in 1541, in which paintings Pieter Bruegel depict Dutch peasants curling. Evidence that curling existed in Scotland in the early 16th century includes a curling stone inscribed with the date 1511 when an old pond was drained at Dunblane, Scotland.

Kilsyth Curling Club claims to be the first club in the world, having been formally constituted in 1716; it is still in existence today. Kilsyth also claims the oldest purpose-built curling pond in the world at Colzium, in the form of a low dam creating a shallow pool some 100 × 250 metres in size, though this is now very seldom in condition for curling because of warmer winters.

The word curling first appears in print in 1620 in Perth, in a poem by Henry...(Read More)





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