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51g. The Decision to Drop the Bomb

51g. The Decision to Drop the Bomb
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


America had the bomb. Now what?When Harry Truman learned of the success of the Manhattan Project, he knew he was faced with a decision of unprecedented gravity. The capacity to end the war with Japan was in his hands, but it would involve unleashing the most terrible weapon ever known.American soldiers and civilians were weary from four years of war, yet the Japanese military was refusing to give...(Read More)

51f. The Manhattan Project

51f. The Manhattan Project
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


Early in 1939, the world's scientific community discovered that German physicists had learned the secrets of splitting a uranium atom. Fears soon spread over the possibility of Nazi scientists utilizing that energy to produce a bomb capable of unspeakable destruction.Scientists Albert Einstein, who fled Nazi persecution, and Enrico Fermi, who escaped Fascist Italy, were now living in the United States....(Read More)

51e. Japanese-American Internment

51e. Japanese-American Internment
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


Despite the lack of any concrete evidence, Japanese Americans were suspected of remaining loyal to their ancestral land. Anti-Japanese paranoia increased because of a large Japanese presence on the West Coast. In the event of a Japanese invasion of the American mainland, Japanese Americans were feared as a security risk.Succumbing to bad advice and popular opinion, President Roosevelt signed an...(Read More)

51d. War in the Pacific

51d. War in the Pacific
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


Defeating Germany was only part of America's mission.Pearl Harbor was only the beginning of Japanese assaults on American holdings in the Pacific. Two days after attacking Pearl Harbor, they seized Guam, and two weeks after that they captured Wake Island. Before 1941 came to a close, the Philippines came under attack.Led by General Douglas MacArthur, the Americans were confident they could hold the...(Read More)

51c. D-Day and the German Surrender

51c. D-Day and the German Surrender
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


The time had finally come. British and American troops had liberated North Africa and pressed on into Italy. Soviet troops had turned the tide at Stalingrad and were slowly reclaiming their territory. The English Channel was virtually free of Nazi submarines, and American and British planes were bombing German industrial centers around the clock.Still, Hitler refused to surrender and hid behind his...(Read More)

51b. The American Homefront

51b. The American Homefront
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


America was the largest military power in the world — in theory.The large population, generous natural resources, advanced infrastructure, and solid capital base were all just potential. Centralization and mobilization were necessary to jump-start this unwieldy machine. Within a week of Pearl Harbor, Congress passed the War Powers Act, granting wide authority to the President to conduct the...(Read More)

51a. Wartime Strategy

51a. Wartime Strategy
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


Three days after Congress declared war on Japan, Germany responded by declaring war on the United States.Japan had an advance pledge of support from Hitler in the event of war with the United States. Now President Roosevelt faced a two-ocean war — a true world war. Despite widespread cries for revenge against Japan, the first major decision made by the President was to concentrate on Germany...(Read More)

51. America in the Second World War

51. America in the Second World War
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-04-30


For the second time in the 20th century, the United States became involved in a devastating world conflict.The mobilization effort of the government in World War II eclipsed even that of World War I. With major operations in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters, American industries literally fueled two wars simultaneously. The social and economic consequences were profound. The Great Migration...(Read More)

50e. Pearl Harbor

50e. Pearl Harbor
Written by Derrick Peterson on 2017-02-10


While the international picture in Europe was growing increasingly dimmer for the United States, relations with Japan were souring as well. Japan's aggression was literally being fueled by the United States. The Japanese military machine relied heavily on imports of American steel and oil to prosecute its assault on China and French Indochina.Placing a strict embargo on Japan would have seemed obvious,...(Read More)





Yoozpaper is a social network of online newspapers written by individuals or groups. Yoozpaper takes free articles that members write and formats them as an online newspaper.

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